Allergies and autoimmune disease

Allergies and Autoimmune disease

A natural approach to  allergy and autoimmune diseases

In Auto-sanguis dilution therapy, small doses of the patient’s blood are prepared as a homeopathic remedy. The effectiveness of this therapy is rooted in the homeopathic principle that small doses of a substance reverse symptoms caused by large doses of the same substance. People who suffer form an autoimmune disease have elevated levels of pro-inflammatory agents, antibodies, and circulating immune complexes in their bloodstream, all of which are involved in the abnormal immune response. A homeopathic mixture containing minute traces of these substances can reduce or even completely eliminate the autoimmune response.

Autosanguis therapy simply means using blood from a patient as a medicine to treat a condition that that patient is suffering from.

The human body is a complex system of constant metabolic processes and interactions. One of the most important components of this system is our blood. It does not only transport all the vital nutrients to the tissues, but also carries many waste products and toxins that are as a result of our metabolism.

Our blood carries all information of current and past processes in the body. As part of this, the genetic information for all antibodies, with which the person started off, is captured with all its inherited deficiencies. At the same time we find traces of all the immune battles that the body had fought up to that point, those that the body had ended in victory as well as those that have left their “battle” scars. We find traces of toxins that the body could not overcome, of metabolites that the body could not breakdown and of waste products that the body could not eliminate. Our blood is one of the main information storage centres of our body.

The basis of autosanguis therapy is one of desensitisation, similar to what a vaccine does. The body reacts to and uses the information provided by the toxins or pathogens as a stimulus to strengthen the immune response and thereby counteract any effects caused by these pathogens or toxins.

In this way the body is able to increase its immunity and destroy the toxins and pathogens contained in the blood. Any allergic reaction, be it from an internal or external stimulus, is thereby counteracted and treated. The body is thus able to neutralise and eliminate the disease causing agents by developing an effective immune response to them.

Essentially, autosanguis therapy teaches the body, via the immune system, how to overcome and eliminate toxins and pathogens that otherwise cause a dysfunction in the body and therefore a disease picture.

 

    Potentised autologous blood as a nosode – The Science stuff 

  1. What do we understand by the term nosode?

Any agent that either causes an illness or carries a disease-causing pathogen, and is administered to the patient in a diluted form, similar to a vaccine, is termed a nosode.

The nosode containing the most information is blood. After all, this is where the genetic information for all antibodies, with which the person started off, is captured with all its inherited deficiencies. At the same time we find traces of all the immune battles that the body had fought up to that point, those that the body had ended in victory as well as those that have left their “battle” scars. We find traces of toxins that the body could not overcome, of metabolites that the body could not breakdown and of waste products that the body could not eliminate. Our blood is one of the main information storage centres of our body.

  1. Definition of autosanguis therapy

Autosanguis therapy simply means using blood from a patient as a medicine to treat a condition that that patient is suffering from. 

  1. History 

Autosanguis therapy has taken on many different forms over the last few centuries.

  • 200 B.C. the practitioners in China used to advise their patients to ingest their own blood for its healing properties. Another technique utilised was needling to create subcutaneous haematomas and was used to treat infectious diseases, pneumonias and chronic inflammations.
  • In ancient Egypt (1500 B.C.) bathing in human blood was used to treat leprosy.
  • In the Middle Ages this therapy of bathing in blood was used to treat leprosy and other skin diseases, and the ingestion of blood was used to treat chronic diseases.
  • During the 17th century often the blood of a goat or pig was used to treat illnesses.
  • In the 17th century the first practices of blood transfusions were recorded.
  • In 1876 the therapeutic use of the patient’s own blood was discovered and used. Schede used to extract some blood from the patient during surgery and then use this blood to assist the healing of the wounds resulting from the surgery.
  • In 1898 the concept of using autologous blood as a nosode was introduced. The two Swedes Elfstrom and Grafstrom used to draw venous blood from a patient, dilute it with saline solution and inject it back subcutaneously. This technique was used to successfully treat pneumonias and tuberculoses.
  • During the 20th century there were many positive reports from the use of autologous blood. The diseases that were treated ranged from different dermatoses, infectious diseases, typhoid, influenza to furunculosis and general immune modulation.
  • In the last few decades a few new techniques were developed. Now there are more than a dozen recognised autosanguis therapies being used in complementary medicine in Europe alone. (2)
  1. Types of autosanguis therapy

There are many different forms of autosanguis therapy. Some of the most prevalent ones are described below:

  1. The most classic form involves drawing venous blood from the patient and re-injecting it immediately without modification. It is injected either sub-cutaneously, intra-cutaneously or intra-muscularly. (2)
  2. An adaptation of this technique is to mix the blood with a homoeopathic or homotoxicological medicine before injection. (2)
  3. The drawn blood can also be enriched with oxygen, ozone or trace elements or be irradiated with ultraviolet light before it is either re-injected intravenously or infused. The amounts of blood needed for this therapy is much larger. (1)
  4. The blood drawn from the patient can also be potentised and used as an autonosode. The blood is potentised according to the centesimal scale and given back to the patient as an oral dose.
  5. In some techniques the plasma is centrifuged out from the blood. This plasma is then added to a serum activator before potentisation. This serum activator could be aluminium hydroxide or silicic acid, which result in the conversion of the autologous antibodies to specific immunogens. Thereby the formation of anti-auto-antibodies is initiated.
  6. A more recently developed method uses haemolysed blood for autosanguis therapy. Here the blood is mechanically haemolysed before it is re-injected into the patient. (1)
  7. Another popular method is using the haemolysed blood as a nosode and potentising it up as a homoeopathic medicine. This medicine is then administered as an oral dose. (2)
  1. Mode of action

 

How can we explain the method of action of a nosode, especially one made from autologous blood?

Hahnemann already admitted that the most superior method for healing is to remove or destroy the root cause of the disease. He also emphasised that the physician needs to present the “enemy” to the body in a suitable manner. (2)

So how are these comments to be understood?

Like every nosode, the therapeutic mechanism is one of desensitisation. The body reacts to and uses the electromagnetic energy provided by the nosode as a stimulus to strengthen the immune response and thereby counteract any effects caused by the pathogen or toxin.

In this way the body is able to increase its immunity and destroy the toxins contained in the blood. Any allergic reaction, be it from an endogenous or exogenous stimulus, is thereby counteracted and treated. The body is thus able to neutralise and eliminate the disease causing agents by developing an effective immune response to them.

The administration of a nosode made from the patient’s own blood will be effective against the agents contained in the system at that point. It will also be effective against these agents should they reappear at any time in the future after a successful initial treatment. It will, however, not be effective against agents that are different from those in the initial blood sample, as they will not be contained in the nosode. (2)

 

  1. Why haemolysed autologous blood?

At the turn of the century Carl Spengler showed that the erythrocytes are the main carriers of immune complexes in the blood. For this reason it is important to utilise whole blood and not merely the plasma or serum. (1)

During the mechanical haemolysation a high pressure is generated and the friction destroys the cell membrane. Through the fragmentation of the autologous blood the cellular components are released and are able to reveal their biological activity. Because 98% of the body’s potassium is contained within cells there is a measurable increase in the potassium levels in the blood serum after the haemolysis. Through the break down of the thrombocytes thrombin is released and through the break down of the leucocytes histamine is released. (1)

The fragments of the whole blood become electrostatically charged and through adhesion form a spherical structure termed a cluster. In addition to this, the fusion results in a spatial rearrangement of the antigens in the autologous blood, which is caused by the respective restructuring (cluster formation) of membrane fragments, plasma and cytosol components. Although these clusters are formed from the body’s own components, their new arrangement is seen by the immune system as a foreign protein structure and it is able to initiate an immune response against them. (1)

 

  1. Advantages of desensitising with potentised autologous

blood:

A major advantage of oral administration of autosanguis isotherapy is that it can easily and safely be used on children without inflicting trauma. Any practitioner who has ever given an injection to a child will know how traumatic this experience can be to the child. This trauma is avoided by giving the medicine orally.

Medicines intended for oral administration have the advantages of being the safest form of autosanguis isotherapy available. Although all medicines still need to be manufactured under Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) conditions, absolute sterility is not necessary. Any possible contaminants such as undesired pathogens are not introduced into the circulatory system, as they do not pass through the mucous membrane barrier of the gastro-intestinal system.

On the other hand, medicines injected into the body, be it by subcutaneous, intra-muscular, intra-venous or intra-arterial injection, bear the risk of introducing harmful pathogens straight into the blood stream. Therefore these medicines need to be manufactured under completely sterile conditions.

Because isotherapy can involve a lengthy treatment regime, the oral administration avoids the repeated traumatic experience of injections.

The advantages of using haemolysed potentised autologous blood can be summarised as follows: (3)

  • all the intra- and extra-cellular components are potentised
  • the exact antigen does not need to be known
  • no allergy testing is required
  • it can also be used for autoimmune conditions
  • there is no seasonal dependancy
  • there are no known contra-indications

–     the efficacy of the therapy is increased by means of a stronger and

more direct stimulus that is given to the immune system

–    as there is a stronger antigen effect, the activation of individual cells

is more efficient

   it can be easily and safely used for treating children

–    there is no trauma or risk of complications from repeated injections